Friday, January 29, 2010

Book - Indian Summer

Indian Summer by Tracy Richardson
Spending most of the summer at her grandparents house out at Lake Pappakeechee, Marcie Horton was not sure if her mothers plan for her to spend time with and go sailing with the “popular girl” Kaitlyn Swyndall would be a good idea. Suddenly she started having feelings of flying and being drawn to James Bay and the woods behind it, then finding out that her new friends dad, Mr. Swyndall, was planning on developing the woods into a new gated community of summer homes made Marcie more uneasy about her growing friendship with Kaitlyn. Bonds were forming while training with the Swyndall kids for the Regatta boat race to be held on July 4th, but how would Marcie’s desire to prevent Mr. Swyndall from building in James woods effect their relationship? When the visions of another time and another girl continued to intrigue Marcie, she and her brother join forces with a family friend (Al Depena) to find a way to stop the development and possibly preserve something of import.

A slow start to this cute and inspirational story. While already dealing with several aspects of being a teenager, Marcie encounters some real moral issues. The way she deals with having visions, overhearing a private conversation and deciding how to stop the woods she loves from being lost to a developer, helps to show her what kind of person she is. She could have given in to peer pressure and left the whole issue alone, but instead she figured out what she felt was the right thing to do and did it. That seems to be the theme, even though she has a few bad moments (eavesdropping and stealing), overall she does what she thinks is right and it works out well. This is quite obviously a young adult book with a long introduction to Marcie and the other characters. While it takes a long time to get to the point, the story is still a interesting one with a few supernatural events and one exciting boat race that didn’t end the way I expected it to. I really liked the interaction with Al, the deference that the younger characters offer him is very nice to see.
( )

No comments: